A Networked World (Part 2)

guest post by David Spivak

Part 1: The problem.

Creating a knowledge network

In 2007, I asked myself: as mathematically as possible, what can formally ground meaningful information, including both its successful communication and its role in decision-making? I believed that category theory could be useful in formalizing the type of object that we call information, and the type of relationship that we call communication.

Over the next few years, I worked on this project. I tried to understand what information is, how it is stored, and how it can be transferred between entities that think differently. Since databases store information, I wanted to understand databases category-theoretically. I eventually decided that databases are basically just categories \mathcal{C}, corresponding to a collection of meaningful concepts and connections between them, and that these categories are equipped with functors \mathcal{C}\to\mathbf{Set}. Such a functor assigns to each meaningful concept a set of examples and connects them as dictated by the morphisms of \mathbf{Set}. I later found out that this “databases as categories” idea was not original; it is due to Rosebrugh and others. My view on the subject has matured a bit since then, but I still like this basic conception of databases.

If we model a person’s knowledge as a database (interconnected tables of examples of things and relationships), then the network of knowledgeable humans could be conceptualized as a simplicial complex equipped with a sheaf of databases. Here, a vertex represents an individual, with her database of knowledge. An edge represents a pair of individuals and a common ground database relating their individual databases. For example, you and your brother have a database of concepts and examples from your history. The common-ground database is like the intersection of the two databases, but it could be smaller (if the people don’t yet know they agree on something). In a simplicial complex, there are not only vertices and edges, but also triangles (and so on). These would represent databases held in common between three or more people.

I wanted “regular people” to actually make such a knowledge network, i.e., to share their ideas in the form of categories and link them together with functors. Of course, most people don’t know categories and functors, so I thought I’d make things easier for them by equipping categories with linguistic structures: text boxes for objects, labeled arrows for morphisms. For example, “a person has a mother” would be a morphism from the “person” object, to the “mother” object. I called such a linguistic category an olog, playing on the word blog. The idea (originally inspired during a conversation with my friend Ralph Hutchison) was that I wanted people, especially scientists, to blog their ontologies, i.e., to write “onto-logs” like others make web-logs.

Ologs codify knowledge. They are like concept webs, except with more rules that allow them to simultaneously serve as database schemas. By introducing ologs, I hoped I could get real people to upload their ideas into what is now called the cloud, and make the necessary knowledge network. I tried to write my papers to engage an audience of intelligent lay-people rather than for an audience of mathematicians. It was a risk, but to me it was the only honest approach to the larger endeavor.

(For students who might want to try going out on a limb like this, you should know that I was offered zero jobs after my first postdoc at University of Oregon. The risk was indeed risky, and one has to be ok with that. I personally happened to be the beneficiary of good luck and was offered a grant, out of the clear blue sky, by a former PhD in algebraic geometry, who worked at the Office of Naval Research at the time. That, plus the helping hands of Haynes Miller and many other brilliant and wonderful people, can explain how I lived to tell the tale.)

So here’s how the simplicial complex of ologs would ideally help humanity steer. Suppose we say that in order for one person to learn from another, the two need to find a common language and align some ideas. This kind of (usually tacit) agreement on, or alignment of, an initial common-ground vocabulary and concept-set is important to get their communication onto a proper footing.

For two vertices in such a simplicial network, the richer their common-ground olog (i.e., the database corresponding to the edge between them) is, the more quickly and accurately the vertices can share new ideas. As ideas are shared over a simplex, all participating databases can be updated, hence making the communication between them richer. In around 2010, Mathieu Anel and I worked out a formal way this might occur; however, we have not yet written it up. The basic idea can be found here.

In this setup, the simplicial complex of human knowledge should grow organically. Scientists, business people, and other people might find benefit in ologging their ideas and conceptions, and using them to learn from their peers. I imagined a network organizing itself, where simplices of like-minded people could share information with neighboring groups across common faces.

I later wrote a book called Category Theory for the Sciences, available free online, to help scientists learn how category theory could apply to familiar situations like taxonomies, graphs, and symmetries. Category theory, simply explained, becomes a wonderful key to the whole world of pure mathematics. It’s the closest thing we have to a universal language of thought, and therefore an appropriate language for forming connections.

My working hypothesis for the knowledge network was this. The information held by people whose worldview is more true—more accurate—would have better predictive power, i.e., better results. This is by definition: I define ones knowledge to be accurate as the extent to which, when he uses this knowledge to direct his actions, he has good luck handling his worldly affairs. As Louis Pasteur said, “Luck favors the prepared mind.” It follows that if someone has a track record of success, others will value finding broad connections into his olog. However, to link up with someone you must find a part of your olog that aligns with his—a functorial connection—and you can only receive meaningful information from him to the extent that you’ve found such common ground.

Thus, people who like to live in fiction worlds would find it difficult to connect, except to other like-minded “Obama’s a Christian”-type people. To the extent you are imbedded in a fictional—less accurate, less predictive—part of the network, you will find it difficult to establish functorial connections to regions of more accurate knowledge, and therefore you can’t benefit from the predictive and conceptual value of this knowledge.

In other words, people would be naturally inclined to try to align their understanding with people that are better informed. I felt hope that this kind of idea could lead to a system in which honesty and accuracy were naturally rewarded. At the very least, those who used it could share information much more effectively than they do now. This was my plan; I just had to make it real.

I had a fun idea for publicizing ologs. The year was in 2008, and I remember thinking it would be fantastic if I could olog the political platform and worldview of Barack Obama and of Sarah Palin. I wished I could sit down with them and other politicians and help them write ologs about what they believed and wanted for the country. I imagined that some politicians might have ologs that look like a bunch of disconnected text boxes—like a brain with neurons but no synapses—a collection of talking points but no real substantive ideas.

Anyway, there I was, trying to understand everything this way: all information was categories (or perhaps sketches) and presheaves. I would work with interested people from any academic discipline, such as materials science, to make ologs about whatever information they wanted to record category-theoretically. Ologs weren’t a theory of everything, but instead, as Jack Morava put it, a theory of anything.

One day I was working on a categorical sketch to model processes within processes, but somehow it really wasn’t working properly. The idea was simple: each step in a recipe is a mini-recipe of its own. Like chopping the carrots means getting out a knife and cutting board, putting a carrot on there, and bringing the knife down successively along it. You can keep zooming into any of these and see it as its own process. So there is some kind of nested, fractal-like behavior here. The olog I made could model the idea of steps in a recipe, but I found it difficult to encode the fact that each step was itself a recipe.

This nesting thing seemed like an idea that mathematics should treat beautifully, and ologs weren’t doing it justice. It was then when I finally admitted that there might be other fish in the mathematical sea.

Part 3: From parts to wholes.

10 Responses to A Networked World (Part 2)

  1. Bruce Smith says:

    The basic idea can be found here.

    The link “here”, https://math.mit.edu/~dspivak/informatics/grants/AFOSR–Proposal.pdf”, has an extra character at the end; removing it avoids the 404 error.

  2. “an olog, playing on the word blog”

    That’s funny since I assumed it was playing off of Prolog, Poplog, Datalog, etc — i.e. other languages associated with knowledge representation and logical reasoning.

    • dspivak says:

      Yeah, the word olog has got a lot of “play” to it. I think we recognized a few different possibilities at the time, but not the ones you mention.

      Another we thought was nice was that word for “the study of X” is “X-ology”, which fits if you say that ologging something is a way of studying it. This version is close to the ones you mention, of course, the common root being logos.

  3. Veli-Pekka Uusluoto says:

    There is also a extra character In link http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.0684 (“a theory of anything” – link).

  4. Günther Stößl says:

    For knowledge representation there exists a rich literature about ontologies and category theory. See for example <a href=http://www.mta.ca/~rrosebru/articles/oeua.pdf#Ontology engineering, universal algebra, and category theory”

  5. At first I thought olog stood for “ontology logic” much like prolog is a contraction of “programming in logic”.

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