Banning Lead in Wetlands

An European Union commission has voted to ban the use of lead ammunition near wetlands and waterways! The proposal now needs to be approved by the European Parliament and Council. They are expected to approve the ban. If so, it will go into effect in 2022. The same commission, called REACH, may debate a complete ban on lead ammunition and fishing weights later this year.

Why does this matter? The European Chemicals Agency has estimated that as many as 1.5 million aquatic birds die annually from lead poisoning because they swallow some of the 5000 tonnes of lead shot that land in European wetlands each year. Water birds are more likely to be poisoned by lead because they mistake small lead shot pellets for stones they deliberately ingest to help grind their food.

In fact, about 20,000 tonnes of lead shot is fired each year in the EU, and 60,000 in the US. Eating game shot with lead is not good for you—but also, even low levels of lead in the environment can cause health damage and negative changes in behavior.

How much lead is too much? This is a tricky question, so I’ll just give some data. In the U.S., the geometric mean of the blood lead level among adults was 1.2 micrograms per deciliter (μg/dL) in 2009–2010. Blood lead concentrations in poisoning victims ranges from 30-80 µg/dL in children exposed to lead paint in older houses, 80–100 µg/dL in people working with pottery glazes, 90–140 µg/dL in individuals consuming contaminated herbal medicines, 110–140 µg/dL in indoor shooting range instructors and as high as 330 µg/dL in those drinking fruit juices from glazed earthenware containers!

The amount of lead that US children are exposed to has been dropping, thanks to improved regulations:

However, what seem like low levels now may be high in the grand scheme of things. The amount of lead has increased by a factor of about 300 in the Greenland ice sheet during the past 3000 years. Most of this is due to industrial emissions:

• Amy Ng and Clair Patterson, Natural concentrations of lead in ancient Arctic and Antarctic ice, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 45 (1981), 2109–2121.

2 Responses to Banning Lead in Wetlands

  1. Thanks much for this–I hadn’t known about either the extent of the problem nor of the moves to deal with it !

You can use Markdown or HTML in your comments. You can also use LaTeX, like this: $latex E = m c^2 $. The word 'latex' comes right after the first dollar sign, with a space after it.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.