Applied Category Theory at NIST

17 February, 2018

I’m looking forward to this workshop organized by Spencer Breiner at the National Institute of Standards and Technology:

• Applied Category Theory: Bridging Theory & Practice, March 15–16, 2018, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.

It’s by invitation only, but it’s part of a movement I’m excited about, so I can’t resist mentioning its existence. Here’s the idea:

What: The Information Technology Laboratory at NIST is pleased to announce a workshop on Applied Category Theory to be held at NIST’s Gaithersburg, Maryland campus on March 15 & 16, 2018. The meeting will focus on practical avenues for introducing methods from category theory into real-world applications, with an emphasis on examples rather than theorems.

Who: The workshop aims to bring together two distinct groups. First, category theorists interested in pursuing applications outside of the usual mathematical fields. Second, domain experts and research managers from industry, government, science and engineering who have in mind potential domain applications for categorical methods.

Intended Outcomes: A proposed landscape of potential CT applications and the infrastructure needed to realize them, together with a 5-10 year roadmap for developing the field of applied category theory. This should include perspectives from industry, academia and government as well as major milestones, potential funding sources, avenues for technology transfer and necessary improvements in tool support and methodology. Exploratory collaborations between category theorists and domain experts. We will ask that each group come prepared to meet the other side. Mathematicians should be prepared with concrete examples that demonstrate practical applications of CT in an intuitive way. Domain experts should bring to the table specific problems to which they can devote time and/or funding as well as some reasons about why they think CT might be relevant to this application.

Invited Speakers:
John Baez (University of California at Riverside) and John Foley (Metron Scientific Solutions).
Bob Coecke (University of Oxford).
Dusko Pavlovic (University of Hawaii).

Some other likely participants include Chris Boner (Metron), Arquimedes Canedo (Siemens at Princeton), Stephane Dugowson (Supméca), William Edmonson (North Carolina A&T), Brendan Fong (MIT), Mark Fuge (University of Maryland), Jack Gray (Penumbra), Steve Huntsman (BAE Systems), Patrick Johnson (Dassault Systèmes), Al Jones (NIST), Cliff Joslyn (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), Richard Malek (NSF), Tom Mifflin (Metron), Ira Monarch (Carnegie Mellon), John Paschkewitz (DARPA), Evan Patterson (Stanford), Blake Pollard (NIST), Emilie Purvine (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), Mark Raugas (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), Bill Regli (University of Maryland), Michael Robinson (American U.) Alberto Speranzon (Honeywell Aerospace), David Spivak (MIT), Eswaran Subrahmanian (Carnegie Mellon), Jamie Vicary (Birmingham and Oxford), and Ryan Wisnesky (Categorical Informatics).

I hope we make a lot of progress—and I plan to let you know how it goes!


Postdoc in Applied Category Theory

8 September, 2017

guest post by Spencer Breiner

One Year Postdoc Position at Carnegie Mellon/NIST

We are seeking an early-career researcher with a background in category theory, functional programming and/or electrical engineering for a one-year post-doctoral position supported by an Early-concept Grant (EAGER) from the NSF’s Systems Science program. The position will be managed through Carnegie Mellon University (PI: Eswaran Subrahmanian), but the position itself will be located at the US National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), located in Gaithersburg, Maryland outside of Washington, DC.

The project aims to develop a compositional semantics for electrical networks which is suitable for system prediction, analysis and control. This work will extend existing methods for linear circuits (featured on this blog!) to include (i) probabilistic estimates of future consumption and (ii) top-down incentives for load management. We will model a multi-layered system of such “distributed energy resources” including loads and generators (e.g., solar array vs. power plant), different types of resource aggregation (e.g., apartment to apartment building), and across several time scales. We hope to demonstrate that such a system can balance local load and generation in order to minimize expected instability at higher levels of the electrical grid.

This post is available full-time (40 hours/5 days per week) for 12 months, and can begin as early as October 1st.

For more information on this position, please contact Dr. Eswaran Subrahmanian (sub@cmu.edu) or Dr. Spencer Breiner (spencer.breiner@nist.gov).