Topological Crystals (Part 2)


k4_crystal

We’re building crystals, like diamonds, purely from topology. Last time I said how: you take a graph X and embed its maximal abelian cover into the vector space H_1(X,\mathbb{R}). Now let me say a bit more about the maximal abelian cover. It’s not nearly as famous as the universal cover, but it’s very nice.

First I’ll whiz though the basic idea, and then I’ll give the details.

The basic idea

By ‘space’ let me mean a connected topological space that’s locally nice. The basic idea is that if X is some space, its universal cover \widetilde{X} is a covering space of X that covers all other covering spaces of X. The maximal abelian cover \overline{X} has a similar universal property—but it’s abelian, and it covers all abelian connected covers. A cover is abelian if its group of deck transformations is abelian.

The cool part is that universal covers are to homotopy theory as maximal abelian covers are to homology theory.

What do I mean by that? For starters, points in \widetilde{X} are just homotopy classes of paths in X starting at some chosen basepoint. And the points in \overline{X} are just ‘homology classes’ of paths starting at the basepoint.

But people don’t talk so much about ‘homology classes’ of paths. So what do I mean by that? Here a bit of category theory comes in handy. Homotopy classes of paths in X are morphisms in the fundamental groupoid of X. Homology classes of paths are morphisms in the abelianized version of the fundamental groupoid!

But wait a minute — what does that mean? Well, we can abelianize any groupoid by imposing the relations

f g = g f

whenever it makes sense to do so. It makes sense to do so when you can compose the morphisms f : x \to y and g : x' \to y' in either order, and the resulting morphisms f g and g f have the same source and the same target. And if you work out what that means, you’ll see it means

x = y = x' = y'

But now let me say it all much more slowly, for people who want a more relaxed treatment.

The details

There are lots of slightly different things called ‘graphs’ in mathematics, but in topological crystallography it’s convenient to work with one that you’ve probably never seen before. This kind of graph has two copies of each edge, one pointing in each direction.

So, we’ll say a graph X = (E,V,s,t,i) has a set V of vertices, a set E of edges, maps s,t : E \to V assigning to each edge its source and target, and a map i : E \to E sending each edge to its inverse, obeying

s(i(e)) = t(e), \quad t(i(e)) = s(e) , \qquad i(i(e)) = e

and

i(e) \ne e

for all e \in E.

That inequality at the end will make category theorists gag: definitions should say what’s true, not what’s not true. But category theorists should be able to see what’s really going on here, so I leave that as a puzzle.

For ordinary folks, let me repeat the definition using more words. If s(e) = v and t(e) = w we write e : v \to w, and draw e as an interval with an arrow on it pointing from v to w. We write i(e) as e^{-1}, and draw e^{-1} as the same interval as e, but with its arrow reversed. The equations obeyed by i say that taking the inverse of e : v \to w gives an edge e^{-1} : w \to v and that (e^{-1})^{-1} = e. No edge can be its own inverse.

A map of graphs, say f : X \to X', is a pair of functions, one sending vertices to vertices and one sending edges to edges, that preserve the source, target and inverse maps. By abuse of notation we call both of these functions f.

I started out talking about topology; now I’m treating graphs very combinatorially, but we can bring the topology back in. From a graph X we can build a topological space |X| called its geometric realization. We do this by taking one point for each vertex and gluing on one copy of [0,1] for each edge e : v \to w, gluing the point 0 to v and the point 1 to w, and then identifying the interval for each edge e with the interval for its inverse by means of the map t \mapsto 1 - t.

Any map of graphs gives rise to a continuous map between their geometric realizations, and we say a map of graphs is a cover if this continuous map is a covering map. For simplicity we denote the fundamental group of |X| by \pi_1(X), and similarly for other topological invariants of |X|. However, sometimes I’ll need to distinguish between a graph X and its geometric realization |X|.

Any connected graph X has a universal cover, meaning a connected cover

p : \widetilde{X} \to X

that covers every other connected cover. The geometric realization of \widetilde{X} is connected and simply connected. The fundamental group \pi_1(X) acts as deck transformations of \widetilde{X}, meaning invertible maps g : \widetilde{X} \to \widetilde{X} such that p \circ g = p. We can take the quotient of \widetilde{X} by the action of any subgroup G \subseteq \pi_1(X) and get a cover q : \widetilde{X}/G \to X.

In particular, if we take G to be the commutator subgroup of \pi_1(X), we call the graph \widetilde{X}/G the maximal abelian cover of the graph X, and denote it by \overline{X}. We obtain a cover

q : \overline{X} \to X

whose group of deck transformations is the abelianization of \pi_1(X). This is just the first homology group H_1(X,\mathbb{Z}). In particular, if the space corresponding to X has n holes, this is the free abelian group on
n generators.

I want a concrete description of the maximal abelian cover! I’ll build it starting with the universal cover, but first we need some preliminaries on paths in graphs.

Given vertices x,y in X, define a path from x to y to be a word of edges \gamma = e_1 \cdots e_\ell with e_i : v_{i-1} \to v_i for some vertices v_0, \dots, v_\ell with v_0 = x and v_\ell = y. We allow the word to be empty if and only if x = y; this gives the trivial path from x to itself.

Given a path \gamma from x to y we write \gamma : x \to y, and we write the trivial path from x to itself as 1_x : x \to x. We define the composite of paths \gamma : x \to y and \delta : y \to z via concatenation of words, obtaining a path we call \gamma \delta : x \to z. We call a path from a vertex x to itself a loop based at x.

We say two paths from x to y are homotopic if one can be obtained from the other by repeatedly introducing or deleting subwords of the form e_i e_{i+1} where e_{i+1} = e_i^{-1}. If [\gamma] is a homotopy class of paths from x to y, we write [\gamma] : x \to y. We can compose homotopy classes [\gamma] : x \to y and [\delta] : y \to z by setting [\gamma] [\delta] = [\gamma \delta].

If X is a connected graph, we can describe the universal cover \widetilde{X} as follows. Fix a vertex x_0 of X, which we call the basepoint. The vertices of \widetilde{X} are defined to be the homotopy classes of paths [\gamma] : x_0 \to x where x is arbitrary. The edges in \widetilde{X} from the vertex [\gamma] : x_0 \to x to the vertex [\delta] : x_0 \to y are defined to be the edges e \in E with [\gamma e] = [\delta]. In fact, there is always at most one such edge. There is an obvious map of graphs

p : \widetilde{X} \to X

sending each vertex [\gamma] : x_0 \to x of \widetilde{X} to the vertex
x of X. This map is a cover.

Now we are ready to construct the maximal abelian cover \overline{X}. For this, we impose a further equivalence relation on paths, which is designed to make composition commutative whenever possible. However, we need to be careful. If \gamma : x \to y and \delta : x' \to y' , the composites \gamma \delta and \delta \gamma are both well-defined if and only if x' = y and y' = x. In this case, \gamma \delta and \delta \gamma share the same starting point and share the same ending point if and only if x = x' and y = y'. If all four of these equations hold, both \gamma and \delta are loops based at x. So, we shall impose the relation \gamma \delta = \delta \gamma only in this case.

We say two paths are homologous if one can be obtained from another by:

• repeatedly introducing or deleting subwords e_i e_{i+1} where
e_{i+1} = e_i^{-1}, and/or

• repeatedly replacing subwords of the form

e_i \cdots e_j e_{j+1} \cdots e_k

by those of the form

e_{j+1} \cdots e_k e_i \cdots e_j

where e_i \cdots e_j and e_{j+1} \cdots e_k are loops based at the same vertex.

My use of the term ‘homologous’ is a bit nonstandard here!

We denote the homology class of a path \gamma by [[ \gamma ]]. Note that if two paths \gamma : x \to y, \delta : x' \to y' are homologous then x = x' and y = y'. Thus, the starting and ending points of a homology class of paths are well-defined, and given any path \gamma : x \to y we write [[ \gamma ]] : x \to y . The composite of homology classes is also well-defined if we set

[[ \gamma ]] [[ \delta ]] = [[ \gamma \delta ]]

We construct the maximal abelian cover of a connected graph X just as we constructed its universal cover, but using homology classes rather than homotopy classes of paths. And now I’ll introduce some jargon that should make you start thinking about crystals!

Fix a basepoint x_0 for X. The vertices of \overline{X}, or atoms, are defined to be the homology classes of paths [[\gamma]] : x_0 \to x where x is arbitrary. Any edge of \overline{X}, or bond, goes from some atom [[ \gamma]] : x_0 \to x to the some atom [[ \delta ]] : x_0 \to y. The bonds from [[ \gamma]] to [[ \delta ]] are defined to be the edges e \in E with [[ \gamma e ]] = [[ \delta ]]. There is at most one bond between any two atoms. Again we have a covering map

q : \overline{X} \to X .

The homotopy classes of loops based at x_0 form a group, with composition as the group operation. This is the fundamental group \pi_1(X) of the graph X. This is isomorphic as the fundamental group of the space associated to X. By our construction of the universal cover, \pi_1(X) is also the set of vertices of \widetilde{X} that are mapped to x_0 by p. Furthermore, any element [\gamma] \in \pi_1(X) defines a deck transformation of \widetilde{X} that sends each vertex [\delta] : x_0 \to x to the vertex [\gamma] [\delta] : x_0 \to x.

Similarly, the homology classes of loops based at x_0 form a group with composition as the group operation. Since the additional relation used to define homology classes is precisely that needed to make composition of homology classes of loops commutative, this group is the abelianization of \pi_1(X). It is therefore isomorphic to the first homology group H_1(X,\mathbb{Z}) of the geometric realization of X.

By our construction of the maximal abelian cover, H_1(X,\mathbb{Z}) is also the set of vertices of \overline{X} that are mapped to x_0 by q. Furthermore, any element [[\gamma]] \in H_1(X,\mathbb{Z}) defines a deck transformation of \overline{X} that sends each vertex [[\delta]] : x_0 \to x to the vertex [[\gamma]] [[\delta]] : x_0 \to x.

So, it all works out! The fundamental group \pi_1(X) acts as deck transformations of the universal cover, while the first homology group H_1(X,\mathbb{Z}) acts as deck transformations of the maximal abelian cover.

Puzzle for experts: what does this remind you of in Galois theory?

We’ll get back to crystals next time.

Read the whole series

Part 1 – the basic idea.

Part 2 – the maximal abelian cover of a graph.

Part 3 – constructing topological crystals.

Part 4 – examples of topological crystals.

One Response to Topological Crystals (Part 2)

  1. Last time I explained how to create the ‘maximal abelian cover’ of a connected graph. Now I’ll say more about a systematic procedure for embedding this into a vector space. That will give us a topological crystal […]

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